I Stand Strong – Crimson’s Creative Challenge

This is my response to Crimson’s Creative Challenge #142

The CCC challenge is open for everyone and asks for creative responses like flash-fic stories, poems, pictures, captions, and, and, and… check it out!

The photograph belongs to Crispina Kemp

I Stand Strong

“I stand strong.

“I triumphed over childhood, a sapling stronger than its siblings, determined and competitive. I raised my arms towards the sun and …”

Sorry to interrupt, but weren’t you planted?

“Oh? Uh. Doesn’t change anything.

“Born into servitude, meant to nurture, I gave them parts of me for sustenance.

“I am an island of vitality in humans’ rural wasteland. I provide shade and food, shelter and exile for those unwanted and deemed useless; for those called pests who, unbeknownst to the exploiters, are an essential building block of life in all its many forms.

“Despite all that, I’m now replaced by younger ones, malleable, easy to manipulate, to train. They’re small but precious, limited but striving hard.

“Me, I’m still friend to bee and bird and hedgehog. My mycorrhiza network makes me kin to grass and herb.

“I am alone, not lonely; bent, not broken.

“I stand strong.”

(150 words)


10 thoughts on “I Stand Strong – Crimson’s Creative Challenge

  1. I love this, Gabi.
    The quotations are confusing because they indicate there are two of them but as we read, other than the “Sorry to interrupt…” the rest feels like it’s the same one?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you Dale.
      What I’ve learned about English quotations is that you leave out the closing quotation when you make a new paragraph but the same person keeps speaking. When the quotation closes, someone else speaks or it’s narration.
      I hope I remembered that correctly, I haven’t worked with my beta reader in ages.

      Liked by 2 people

          1. No. Like I said, you can tell it’s mostly the one speaking. It was me who did not see the lack of end quotations.

            To make it clearer, you could put the “Sorry…” In italics. It’s the only time he/she/it speaks. But really. You were perfect grammatically! And the story was great too!

            Liked by 1 person

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